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Tech blogs rule CES. Tech brands don’t.

Last week, we tracked tweets about CES, the Consumer Electronics Show, which ran from January 6 – January 9 in Las Vegas, Nevada. More than 140,000 people from around the world attended this enormous technology and electronics event.

And when we say enormous, we really do mean enormous. We used the TweetReach Tracker to monitor tweets for one week around CES (the two days leading up to the event, the four days of the event, and the day after the event). And during that week, we tracked:

443,290 tweets
from 136,738 contributors

generating 1,112,409,883 impressions
reaching 42,200,045 people

That’s more than 1.1 billion impressions delivered to a potential unique audience of more than 42 million people. Nearly half a million tweets were posted about CES, from more than 135 thousand different Twitter accounts. That’s pretty enormous.

The number of tweets about CES reached a high point on January 7, the second day of the event, resulting in more than 130,000 tweets posted that day.

During the main hours of the event on January 7 (from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. PST), an average of 7,162 tweets were posted every hour, with a maximum of 8,429 between 10 a.m. and 11 a.m. During the four days of the trade show, an average of 3,700 tweets were posted every hour, with generally higher volumes in the afternoons.

We expected to see a lot of tweets from – and retweets of – major tech and electronics brands. And while there were definitely plenty of tweets about CES from accounts like @BlackBerry (and @BlackBerryHelp), @SamsungTweets, @kodakCB, and @Sony, most high-impact tweets came from other sources. The most influential contributors in this Tracker were mostly mainstream media outlets, tech blogs, and geeky celebrities, with only a couple tech companies making a big impact. Here’s a list of the top 12 most influential contributors to the CES Tracker. These 12 accounts contributed the top 50 tweets by overall exposure (our impressions metric) and accounted for 148 million of those 1.1 billion total impressions.

This was definitely one of the biggest events we’ve ever tracked tweets about, especially in terms of overall impressions generated. We’re curious what will top it. Maybe the Academy Awards? Guess we’ll see next month.

PS – If you’re interested in how we calculate reach, exposure and our metrics, we explain it all here. Also, we’ve been tracking tweets about the Verizon iPhone and wrote up an analysis of those tweets here. If you think this CES data is impressive, check out the iPhone data.

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